How to Plant and Grow Chamomile

Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) grows from seeds or seedlings. Chamomile prefers full sun but will tolerate some shade. The soil should be well-drained and rich in organic matter. Chamomile is a drought-tolerant plant, so it does not need a lot of water once it is established.

Botanical Name:Chamomilla recutita
Other Names:German chamomile, Hungarian chamomile, wild chamomile
Type of Plant:Annual herb
Size and Appearance:Grows to a height of 12-24 inches. Has hairy stems and finely divided leaves. The flowers are white with yellow centers.

Planting Time:

Spring.

Blossoming Time:

Summer.

Propagation:

From seed or seedlings.

Sun:

Full sun.

Temperature:

Between 60 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit or 15°C to 20°C

Soil:

Well-drained soil.

Watering:

Doesn´t require much water.

Fertilize:

Fertilize monthly with a balanced fertilizer such as 10-10-10.

Uses:

Chamomile can be used fresh or dried in teas, as an ingredient in natural beauty products, or as a decoration.

How to grow Chamomile in the garden

  1. Buy Chamomile seeds from a reputable source.
  2. Prepare the garden bed by tilling the soil and removing any weeds or debris.
  3. Sow the seeds in rows, spacing them about 12 inches apart.
  4. Water the seeds gently with a watering can or hose attachment.
  5. Keep the soil moist but not soggy until the seeds germinate, which usually takes about 10 days.
  6. Once the seedlings emerge, thin them out so that only the strongest plants remain, spaced about 18 inches apart.
  7. Continue to water regularly, especially during dry spells. Chamomile prefers well-drained soil so be sure not to overwater.
  8. Fertilize monthly with a balanced fertilizer such as 10-10-10.
  9. When the plants are 6-8 inches tall, begin harvesting the leaves and flowers for use in teas or other recipes. Chamomile can also be dried for later use.
  10. To encourage continued blooming, deadhead spent flowers regularly throughout the growing season.
  11. In late fall, cut back the plants to about 6 inches tall to tidy up the garden bed and prepare for winter dormancy.

Chamomile will come back each year and does not need to be replanted unless you want to start fresh with new seedlings

1. Buy Chamomile seeds from a reputable source.

There are many places where chamomile seeds can be bought, but the best place is probably a local nursery or garden center. They will have the freshest seeds and will be able to give you advice on how to grow them.

2. Prepare the garden bed by tilling the soil and removing any weeds or debris.

Chamomile prefers full sun and well-drained soil. It is drought tolerant once established.

To prepare the soil in the garden for Chamomile seeds, first, loosen the topsoil with a spade or tiller.

Remove any rocks or debris that you may find. Next, use a rake to level off the area.

Once the area is prepared, you can then sow your Chamomile seeds. Water the area well and keep it moist until the seeds have germinated and begun to grow.

3. Sow the seeds in rows, spacing them about 12 inches apart.

Chamomile seeds can be sown in the garden as soon as the ground is warm in spring.

The best time to sow them is in early to mid-April.

Chamomile seeds should be sown on the surface of the soil and lightly covered with soil. They need full sun and well-drained soil to grow well.

4. Water the seeds gently with a watering can or hose attachment.

Chamomile needs a lot of water when it is first planted because its roots are not yet established.

Once the roots are established, the plant will need less water.

5. Keep the soil moist but not soggy until the seeds germinate, which usually takes about 10 days.

Chamomile needs moist, well-drained soil.

If the soil is too soggy, the plant’s roots will rot.

6. Once the seedlings emerge, thin them out so that only the strongest plants remain, spaced about 18 inches apart.

Chamomile seedlings have two small, oval-shaped leaves at the top of a thin stem.

The leaves are usually a bright green color, and the stem is typically a light green or white color.

The seedlings are very small, and they often have a few small roots coming out of the bottom of the stem.

Chamomile seedlings should be thinned out when they are about 4 inches tall.

The reason for this is so that the plants have room to grow and develop properly. When thinning out chamomile seedlings, be sure to leave about 8 inches between each plant.

7. Continue to water regularly, especially during dry spells. Chamomile prefers well-drained soil so be sure not to overwater.

Chamomile needs a lot of water when it is first planted because its roots are not yet established and it needs to grow a strong root system.

Once the plant is established, it does not need as much water.

8. Fertilize monthly with a balanced fertilizer such as 10-10-10.

Chamomile is a light feeder and doesn’t need much fertilizer.

You can fertilize chamomile once a month with a balanced liquid fertilizer or use a slow-release fertilizer at planting time.

Chamomile prefers slightly acidic soil with a pH of 6.0 to 7.0.

9. When the plants are 6-8 inches tall, begin harvesting the leaves and flowers for use in teas or other recipes. Chamomile can also be dried for later use.

Chamomile can be harvested anytime from when the plant has started to bloom until the end of the blooming season.

The best time to harvest chamomile is in the morning after the dew has evaporated and before the heat of the day sets in.

Chamomile should be cut at stem level, just above where a leaf is attached.

10. To encourage continued blooming, deadhead spent flowers regularly throughout the growing season.

Chamomile flowers should be deadheaded when they start to fade and die. This will encourage the plant to produce more flowers.

To deadhead, simply cut off the faded flower heads at the base of the plant.

11. In late fall, cut back the plants to about 6 inches tall to tidy up the garden bed and prepare for winter dormancy.

Chamomile plants should be cut back in late fall to help them overwinter and to encourage new growth in the spring.

When cutting back chamomile plants, cut them down to about 6 inches above the ground.

This will help the plant to overwinter and also encourage new growth in the spring.

Chamomile will come back each year and does not need to be replanted unless you want to start fresh with new seedlings.

How to grow Chamomile in a planting pot

Chamomile on wooden table
  1. Buy Chamomile seeds, a planting pot, and some potting mix.
  2. Fill a planting pot with a well-draining potting mix.
  3. Sow the seeds on the surface of the potting mix and lightly press them into the mix.
  4. Water the seeds gently with a spray bottle.
  5. Place the pot in a warm, sunny location.
  6. Keep the soil moist but not wet, watering as needed with a spray bottle.
  7. When the seedlings are 2-3 inches tall, thin them out so that only the strongest seedling remains in each pot.
  8. Fertilize if needed with a balanced liquid fertilizer during the growing season.
  9. Deadhead spent flowers to encourage continued blooming.
  10. In late fall, cut back the plants to encourage new growth in spring.
  11. Overwinter indoors in a cool, bright location if you live in an area with cold winters. Bring outdoors again in spring when all danger of frost has passed.

Enjoy your beautiful Chamomile plants!

In the following, I will cover each step in a little more detail.

1. Buy Chamomile seeds, a planting pot, and some potting mix.

Chamomile seeds can be bought at many places, including online retailers, health food stores, and some grocery stores.

A small planting pot is needed for Chamomile seeds, and a well-draining potting mix is best.

2. Fill a planting pot with a well-draining potting mix.

The perfect pot for Chamomile seeds would be a small, shallow pot with drainage holes.

The pot should be made of a light-colored material such as ceramic or plastic, and it should have a saucer to catch any water that drains out.

The perfect potting mix for Chamomile should be well-draining and have a slightly acidic pH.

Examples of good potting mixes for Chamomile include those made with perlite, vermiculite, or coco coir.

3. Sow the seeds on the surface of the potting mix and lightly press them into the mix.

Chamomile seeds can be sown indoors in late winter or early spring, about 6-8 weeks before the last frost.

Sow the seeds on the surface of a well-drained seed-starting mix and lightly cover them with soil. 

4. Water the seeds gently with a spray bottle.

A Chamomile right after sowing the seeds needs a lot of water. It should be watered every day, and the soil should be kept moist.

5. Place the pot in a warm, sunny location.

Chamomile prefers full sun but will tolerate some light shade.

The perfect spot for chamomile indoors in a pot is a sunny windowsill. Chamomile needs full sun to grow well, so a sunny windowsill is an ideal location.

6. Keep the soil moist but not wet, watering as needed with a spray bottle.

To water chamomile seeds with a spray bottle, fill the bottle with water and then lightly mist the seeds.

This is a good technique because it allows you to control how much water the seeds get and prevents them from getting too wet.

7. When the seedlings are 2-3 inches tall, thin them out so that only the strongest seedling remains in each pot.

To thin chamomile seedlings, first, wait until they are about 4-6 inches tall.

Then, using a sharp knife or scissors, cut off the weaker seedlings at the base, leaving only the strongest ones.

Be sure to space the remaining seedlings about 8-10 inches apart.

8. Fertilize if needed with a balanced liquid fertilizer during the growing season.

The perfect fertilizer for Chamomile that grows indoors is a slow-release fertilizer that is high in nitrogen.

9. Deadhead spent flowers to encourage continued blooming.

Chamomile flowers should be deadheaded when they start to fade and die.

This will encourage the plant to produce more flowers. To deadhead, simply cut off the faded flower heads at the base of the plant.

10. In late fall, cut back the plants to encourage new growth in spring.

To encourage new growth in spring, cut back the chamomile plant by about one-third of its height.

This will encourage the plant to produce new growth from the base.

11. Overwinter indoors in a cool, bright location if you live in an area with cold winters. Bring outdoors again in spring when all danger of frost has passed.

Chamomile flowers can be overwintered indoors by placing them in a sunny spot. Water them regularly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings.

Cut back on watering as the weather cools down in autumn. In late autumn or early winter, bring the pots inside to a cool, bright room. Keep an eye on the plants and water them sparingly, as needed.

The chamomile plants will go dormant over winter and may lose their leaves. They will start to grow again in spring.

Enjoy your beautiful Chamomile plants!

How to use chamomile

Chamomile is a plant that has been used for centuries in various cultures for its medicinal properties.

Chamomile tea is a popular home remedy for insomnia and anxiety, and chamomile essential oil is used in aromatherapy. Chamomile can also be found in some food and cosmetic products.

In food, chamomile may be used as a flavoring agent or as a natural food coloring.

Chamomile tea is a popular home remedy for insomnia and anxiety, and chamomile essential oil is used in aromatherapy. Chamomile can also be found in some food and cosmetic products.

In medicine, chamomile is sometimes taken orally as a supplement or tincture or applied topically as an ointment or compress.

Chamomile is thought to have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties. It is commonly used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, skin conditions, and anxiety.

In esoteric practices, chamomile is associated with the element of water and the planet Venus. It is often used in spells and rituals for love, healing, and protection.

Chamomile is also said to promote psychic abilities and dream work.

The meaning of chamomile can vary depending on the context in which it is used. In general, however, chamomile represents purity, peace, love, and healing.

Facts about chamomile

Dried chamomile flowers on wooden table.Alternative medicine.Bowls of dry medicinal herbs
  • Chamomile is a plant in the daisy family
  • Chamomile has been used for centuries as a medicinal herb
  • Chamomile is thought to be native to Europe and Asia
  • Chamomile is used to treat a variety of conditions including anxiety, insomnia, and stomach problems
  • Chamomile tea is a popular home remedy for many ailments

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Written By Vincent

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